Roofing 101- Complete guide to Roofing

About the Author


John Harding has been involved in home improvements and services, specially roofing and its related sub niches for more than 15 years. He has reviewed numerous products first hand and had provided useful insights into the pros and cons of each product. Many customers have found his findings extremely helpful when making a buying decision. Hope you will find John's and his teams work helpful as well.


John Harding

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Your roof could comprise as much as 40% of the exterior of your home. Your roof doesn't just enhance the look of your home. It can also keep your property secure and keep you dry.

It's likely that you'll need to replace the roof on your home at one point or another. However, replacing a roof can be an overwhelming prospect for many homeowners. It's smart to familiarize yourself with frequently used roofing components and terms. That way, it'll be easier for you to decide how you should proceed with a roofing project.

Components of a Roof

A range of materials can be used for roofs. You should be aware of these seven components:

  • Shingles: Shingles are designed to protect the sheathing on a roof from the elements. S Shingles are usually square in shape and can be constructed from many different materials. You'll want to look at the size of a roof when determining how many squares of shingles you need to order. A square of shingles will cover 100 square feet.
  • Sheating: This describes the material that is connected to the rafters covering your home. It may also be described as the roof deck. It can be made from sheet material or boards.
  • Rafters: These are essentially the bones of a roof. They are slats made from wood and metal that help to support the shingles and sheathing. 
  • Underlayment: This material, which is similar to paper and resistant to water, is placed over plywood sheathing. It seals the sheathing and protects it from the elements. It is combined with a vapor and membrane vapor. This is usually a sheet of plastic that prevents water and air from permeating the surface. 
  • Flashing: In order to prevent water damage from occurring at the joints of a roof system, sheet metal or another type of material will be installed over the joints. Flashing is able to seal joints off from the elements.
  • Drainage: Roofs need to be able to shed water, which is where this design feature comes in. Typically, roofs are designed so that water will naturally run off the roof. This is usually referred to as the slope or pitch of the roof.

Elements Frequently Seen In Roof Design 

Once you're aware of the components a roof is comprised of, you'll want to learn more about common elements in roofing design. From there, you can see which of these elements are used in your home.

Gables

Gables

Gable Wall:

 This describes triangular sections of a roof that reach from the eaves to a roof's peak.


Ridge:

 This is a roof's peak or its highest point.

Ridge Centerline

This is also referred to as a verge. It describes the rafter or wall that is beneath a roof's edge, at the spot where the gable ends.


Valley:

 This describes the parts of a roof where two different sections connect and slop downward.


Eaves: 

These are the edges of a roof. They hang past a house's exterior walls.



Hip: 

This is the high point of a roof, where two different sections connect.



Abutment: 

This is an area where parts of a roof connect with a vertical area, like a chimney or a wall.



Dormers:

 Dormers aren't present on every roof, but they are a common feature. They're portions of the roof that stick out. Their purpose is to allow more natural light into the attic or the upper floor of a home.


If you inspect your home from the outside, you should be able to see which of these design elements are present on your roof. You should also keep track of the number of ridges, hips, gables, and abutments that are present. If you plan to replace your roof, you'll want to take the design of your existing roof into consideration. You'll also want to be aware of the total square footage of your roof. This will help you to calculate potential costs.

What you should know before replacing a Roof 

1. When Was The Last Time Your Roof Was Installed Or Repaired? 


Has the roof of your home been replaced since your home was built? If your roof is on the older side, you'll want to watch out for potential problems. You may even need to call professionals so that you can have your roof replaced. When is it necessary to replace a roof? That will vary based on a range of factors, such as the type of shingles you have and the structure of the roof. A roof with asphalt shingles should last around 20 years before it needs to be replaced. A wood shake roof could last for as long as 30 years.

2. What Sort Of Ventilation System Does Your Roof Have? 


If you want a reliable roofing system, dependable ventilation is essential. Issues with airflow could increase the risk of issues with mildew and mold. You'll want to look at the roof's primary vent. You'll also want to look at other factors that may be impacting how air moves from your attic to your roof.

You should pop into your attic and keep an eye out for these things: Insulation without gaps across the floor of the attic. A vapor barrier beneath the insulation and alongside the ceiling. The insulation will help to prevent heat gain and loss, while the vapor barrier will keep moisture from entering the attic.

You'll also want to look for spaces with proper ventilation that will allow air to pass in and out of the attic. As a rule of thumb, there should be around a foot of vent space for every 150 square feet's worth of space in the attic. You can use this to determine the number of vents your roof needs.

You should also make sure there is at least one inch between your roof sheathing and your insulation.

3. Look At The Types Of Shingles Your Roof Is Made From 

There are many different materials that can be used to make roof shingles, such as wood, asphalt, and slate. Some materials are more durable than others. Furthermore, the location that you're in can have an impact on the resilience of your shingles. For example, if you live in an area where temperatures can get very cold, or where there are severe winds, shingles made from clay could crack.

4. Determining A Roof's Fire Rating 


There is a fire rating system that's used to determine how resistant various roofing materials are to fire. There are three separate ratings: A, B, and C. Materials in the A-class are the most resistant to fire. Clay shingles, fiberglass asphalt composition shingles, and metals are all Class A materials.

5. The Slop Of A Roof 


A roof's slope can help to determine the type of shingles that are suitable for the roof.

Factors to consider when choosing a snow removal rake

1. Length

When choosing the right rake, it is vital to consider the height of your roof in relation to the length of its handle. Snow removal rakes are extendable, so you should look at the maximum extension length of the handle.

However, most rakes are not very useful when extended to their full length; hence you should choose one that you don't have to stretch to its full extent to reach your roof.

2. Design

​The design of the rake significantly affects its comfort ability and effectiveness. It is better to choose a rake with a design that offers a good grip and doesn't get stuck on your roof edge. Also, rakes can cause damage to your roof shingles; hence you should choose one that won't damage your roof.

Curve-bladed and wheeled rakes are the best at protecting your roof.

3. Weight

​The weight of the rake has great significance on the level of comfort it provides and proper handling. Heavy rakes are very uncomfortable to use and also make you fatigued. You should go for a lightweight rake, but be sure to check the materials it is made of as a material like wood breaks when subjected to a lot of weight.

4. Durability

​Nobody wants to see their money go down the drain; hence you should consider buying a rake that doesn't break or rust. Rakes with aluminum handles and polyethylene are the most durable as they are not susceptible to rust and breakage.

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